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Film industry to get multi-million-rand boost from KZN government

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South Africa’s provincial government of KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) will dish out more than R30 million ($1.9 million dollars) to finance film productions this year, Provincial Minister of Economic Development, Tourism and Environmental Affairs, Nomusa Dube-Ncube said.

According to Dube-Ncube on Tuesday, 15 September 2020, the funds will fund film productions, development projects, and local film festivals in 2020, as part of the provincial government’s assistance to the COVID-19-hit industry. Dube-Ncube said the financing of the local film industry is part of the province’s implementation of the Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan that Cabinet approved recently.

“We are encouraged by the fact that the film industry in KwaZulu-Natal, from pre-production to distribution, is playing a vital role in driving socio-economic development in our province,” Dube-Ncube said.

She added, “[The film industry] generates many more jobs indirectly in the support and hospitality industries, stimulating business in hotels, catering companies, restaurants and transport providers.”

Dube-Ncube has pledged her office’s continued support to nurture an excellent skills base in the area of film production, with excellent film locations offers at competitive rates through the KwaZulu-Natal Film Commission.

“The nomination of six of our funded projects for the South African Film and Television Awards further indicates that the film industry can become a significant player in the national and international market,” she said.

The films include; My Zulu Wedding, Uncovered, Keeping Up With The Kandasamys, Kings Of Mulberry Street, Love Lives Here, 3 Days to Go and Deep End.

South Africa has a world-renowned film industry, with its films having won international awards over the years. The locally produced feature film, Tsotsi, won an Oscar Award under the f Best Foreign Film category in 2006.

-APA

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